How Removing Your Name from a Shared Credit Card Affects Your Credit Score

Credit cards exceptional financial instruments. They allow you to buy without any cash and earn rewards while at it. Another interesting feature is the option of adding another person as an authorized user to your card. However, credit card usage does have a huge impact on your creditworthiness. So, does removing your name from a […]

The post How Removing Your Name from a Shared Credit Card Affects Your Credit Score appeared first on Credit Absolute.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Apple Card $50 Signup Bonus When You Spend $50 At ExxonMobil

The Offer

Direct Link to offer

  • Apple is offering a $50 bonus when signing up for Apple Card and spend $50 at Exxon Mobil via Apple Pay. Valid until 1/31/21.

 

Card Details

  • No annual fee
  • No foreign transaction fee
  • No cash advance fees
  • No late payment fees (late or missed payments will result in additional interest accumulating toward your balance)
  • No over-the-limit fees, no balance transfer fees, no expedited card delivery fee
  • Card earns the following rewards:
    • 3% cash back on Apple purchases and services (including the app store, Apple Music payments, etc.)
    • 3% cash back on ExxonMobil, Panera Bread, Walgreen’s, Duane Reade, Uber, UberEATS, T-Mobile store purchases, and Nike when using Apple Pay 
    • 2% cash back on all Apple Pay purchases
    • 1% cash back when using the physical card

Our Verdict

We’ve seen the same deal for various other merchants. There was a $75 offer for Nike, but I think a lot of people will prefer $50 at the gas station.

Hat tip to Milestomemories

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Signing the back of your credit card is an important security step for protecting your card’s information if it should fall into the wrong hands. Merchants are supposed to check that the signature on the card matches the signature on the sales receipt as a security precaution. If a card has no signature on the back, they aren’t required to process the ensuing payment.

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Signing the back of your credit card is always better than not, without exception. It’s another step provided by your credit card company to try and keep your personal information as safe as possible. When used in conjunction with the card verification value (CVV) on your card, it creates a line of defense should a fraudster try to swipe your plastic.

While the signature itself doesn’t protect you, the ability for a salesman to match it to your existing official signatures is where its value lies. This is done most commonly with your driver’s license, or if you’re abroad, your passport is a fine stand-in. In other words, taking a few seconds to sign that little black or white strip could be the difference between your identity being stolen and not.

Here’s a look at how the major credit payment networks handle unsigned cards:

Mastercard

Mastercard urges merchants in its payment network not to accept charges from customers with unsigned credit cards. On the back of every Mastercard, it even says “not valid unless signed.”

The company tries to instill in merchants that they should not process customer transactions unless the customer’s signature appears in the signature space on the back of the card.

If the card has no signature, merchants are to request the customer sign the card. A merchant also will need to see a confirming form of identification.

Visa

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

At Visa, merchants must verify that the signature on the back of any card matches the customer’s signature on the transaction receipt and any identification. They want to know you are who you say you are and recreating the same signature on demand when you sign for a credit card transaction is one way to do it.

Visa considers an unsigned credit card to be invalid. The words “Not Valid Without Signature” appear above, below or beside the signature panel on all Visa cards. Turn over the card and you’ll see it. And like Mastercard, Visa urges merchants not to accept unsigned credit cards.

When a customer presents an unsigned Visa card to a merchant for payment, Visa requires a merchant to check the customer’s identification by requesting a government-issued form of ID.

Where permissible by state law, the Visa merchant may also write the customer’s ID serial number and expiration date on the sales receipt. (Beginning in California in 1971, the recording of personal information during credit card transactions has become illegal, with the passage of the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act.)

Visa also instructs merchants to ask the customer to sign the card, within full view of the merchant. They then check that the customer’s newly written signature on the credit card matches the signature on the customer’s ID. If a customer refuses to sign a Visa card, the card is considered invalid and cannot be processed. Merchants will then be forced to ask the customer for another form of payment.

Discover

Discover keeps things very simple. The company urges its cardholders to sign the backs of their Discover cards as soon as they activate them.  This is because the signature makes the card valid and a cashier may decline the transaction if the card is not signed. 

American Express

American Express also urges retailers to compare a customer’s signature on the back of an American Express card with the transaction sales receipt. And if an American Express card is presented unsigned, the clerk is to request a photo ID of the customer with a signature. Following this, they must request the customer sign the back of the American Express card and the sales receipt while the clerk is holding on to the customer’s photo ID.

Writing “See ID” on a Credit Card

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Writing “see ID” or “check ID” on a credit card might seem like a great way to protect from fraud. But it actually may invalidate the card. This is because only your valid signature that a merchant can match with a signature on a sales receipt is acceptable. In some cases, the merchant may ask you for another card to make your purchase. To save yourself from a slower-than-needed transaction at the cash register, sign your credit card as intended.

Tips for Protecting Against Credit Card Fraud

  • Only carry the credit cards you need. When you travel, keep a list of the credit cards that you have with you. Make note of their full account numbers and expiration dates, as well as contact numbers for the issuers. It will come in handy if something should happen to your wallet, phone or both when traveling.
  • Go paperless and start checking your credit card statements online to avoid having to keep and shred your paper statements. Just be sure to keep your online passwords in a safe place and to update them from time to time.
  • Check your credit card transactions each month to check for errors or suspicious activity. Quickly report any transaction you don’t recognize to your card issuer.

Find the Top 3 Financial Advisors for You

  • Finding the right financial advisor that fits your needs doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that will help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/PeopleImages, Â©iStock.com/hsyncoban, Â©iStock.com/RichLegg

The post Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

10 Ways to Build Credit Without a Credit Card

A woman in a bright red shirt smiles and looks at her cellphone while making notes in her notebook about building credit without a credit card

Credit cards are a great tool for building credit. They’re easy to use, offer flexibility, and sometimes even reward you for using them. Most also directly impact your credit score and are used by many people to begin building their credit profile.

But what if you don’t want a credit card or are having trouble qualifying one? Don’t worry. There are other plenty of other ways to build a strong credit history. Here are ten options for building credit without a credit card.

1. ExtraCredit

The easiest way to start building your credit without getting a credit card is to sign up for ExtraCredit and add your rent and utility payments to your credit profile. With ExtraCredit, you can use the service to add bills not typically reported to the bureaus and get credit for bills you’re already paying. We help strengthen your credit profile by adding your rent and utility payments as tradelines to your credit reports with all three credit bureaus. Continue paying those bills on time, and rent reporting can help you add more to your credit history and help you work your way up to a good credit profile.

Build Credit with ExtraCredit

2. Authorized User Status

Authorized user status is a great way to begin building credit—as long as you and the primary cardholder are on the same page. As an authorized user, you can use the primary cardholder’s credit card and piggyback off their credit card activity. Even if you never use the card, card activity can still be used to positively impact your credit. You’ll want to verify with the credit card company that they report card activity for authorized users. Otherwise, you’ll be wasting your time.

This method comes with some risks, though. Your credit report will reflect how the card is used, even if you’re not the one using it. If you or the primary cardholder racks up an excessive balance or misses payments, that activity could end up damaging your credit instead of helping it. Only become an authorized user if you are both committed to practicing smart credit-building habits.

3. Credit Builder Loans

Credit builder loans aren’t widely publicized, but they are a great way to build credit without a credit card. Smaller institutions like credit unions are generally more likely to offer credit builder loans specifically to help borrowers build credit.

Typically, you borrow a small amount, which is put into a CD or savings account and held until the loan is paid off. You make payments for a set amount of time until the loan is paid. At that time, you can access the funds, including any interest earned from the savings account. And if you’ve made all your payments on time, you’ve been successfully building your credit all along.

These loans often have low interest rates and are accessible to those with poor or nonexistent credit. That’s because you provide all of the collateral for the loan in cash, so it’s not a risk for the lender. Credit builder loans aren’t great if you need the money now—since you need to pay off the loan before you can actually access the funds—but if you have time to build up your credit, they’re a great place to start.

4. Passbook or CD Loans

Similar to credit-builder loans, passbook or CD loans are offered by some banks to existing customers using the balance you already have in a CD or savings account. You build credit as you pay down the loan, and you can access your balance once the loan is paid off. These are very similar to credit building loans, but they use funds you already had in savings as collateral. Interest rates are typically much lower than credit cards or unsecured personal loans as well. Make sure your bank will report payments to the three major credit bureaus before opening this type of loan.

5. Peer-to-Peer Loans

Peer-to-peer loans are made by an individual investor or groups of investors instead of traditional financial institutions, with the accrued interest going back to the investors. While they may sound sketchy, P2P loans are completely legitimate and can be set up through a reputable P2P service like LendingClub—unlike borrowing money from your cousin.

P2P loans will typically accept borrowers with lower credit scores than traditional lenders, but their credit requirements and interest rates will vary depending on the lender—and their rates and fees may be higher than other personal loans. Before you take out this type of loan, ask whether the service reports your timely payments to the credit bureaus so you can get a positive impact on your score.

6. Federal Student Loans

If you’re a student looking to build credit, you may consider a federal student loan. Most federal student loans don’t require any credit history. Private options, on the other hand, often require good credit scores or a cosigner. Don’t take on student debt just to build your credit, but if you’re already considering a student loan, they could be a good way to get started. Federal student loans show up on your credit report, and if they’re paid on time, they can help you build a positive payment history.

7. Personal Loans

Some lenders offer unsecured personal loans to individuals with no or bad credit. These involve borrowing a fixed amount of money and making fixed payments every month. If you don’t have an established credit history, you will likely be charged a higher interest rate. You may be able to get a co-signer to help your odds of approval for lower rates.

Don’t bother with payday loans. These will not help you establish credit history and will just end up costing you money in the long run. Alternatives like OppLoans do report payment history to the credit bureaus, but their rates are typically higher than traditional personal loans.

Apply for a Personal Loan

8. Auto Loans

Most traditional auto loan dealers report all your payments to the credit bureaus. And since auto loans are secured by the vehicle, they’re less risk for the lender than unsecured loans. That means you might be able to qualify for them even if your credit isn’t stellar—though that might come with the expense of higher interest. If you make your loan payments on time, you might be able to positively impact your score and refinance later, though.

9. Mortgages

Getting a mortgage with no credit history is difficult but not impossible. If your goal is just to start building credit, a mortgage may not be the best place to start. But if you’re ready for home ownership and the possibility of building your credit with a mortgage, you have options. First-time homebuyers may consider FHA mortgage, for example, which is available to individuals with a thin credit file. Smaller lenders like credit unions tend to be more flexible and may help you qualify for a mortgage as well.

Your credit score might take a hit when you first assume a huge debt, but it will rise over time with regular monthly payments. Concentrate on making those payments on time to continue building your credit.

10. Rent

Most credit reports do not contain entries regarding your rent payments simply because landlords don’t bother reporting that activity. But credit bureaus will incorporate timely rent payments into your credit report if that information is submitted to them. If you’re evaluating a rental or you currently rent, ask the landlord if they will report your rent payments. You might also be able to use online rent payment applications to ensure this information is reported.

Want to get credit for your on-time rent payments? Sign up for ExtraCredit. Our unique Build It feature will submit rent and utility payments to the three credit bureaus on your behalf, so you can get credit for paying those bills on time. In fact, we’ll look for your past payments to make sure they are submitted so you get credit for previous rent and utility payments as well.

Keys to Building Credit

Whatever option you choose to build credit without a credit card, you must make payments on time consistently. Late payments deal severe damage to your credit score. Avoid financial obligations that put you at risk of making late payments or defaulting.

You also need to keep in mind your account mix. If you only have installment loans and no revolving credit such as credit cards, you won’t have an ideal account mix. Account mix makes up about 10% of your credit score.

Your credit utilization ratio—or the amount of credit you have tied up in debt—might also suffer if you have no credit card or other form of revolving credit. However, in most cases, no credit utilization is better than high credit utilization.

Ready for a Credit Card?

If you’re ready to try building your credit with a credit card, try a secured credit card. These cards are often available to people with bad or no credit, and they typically start with smaller credit limits that can help you learn responsible money management habits.

OpenSky® Secured Visa® Credit Card

Apply Now

on Capital Bank’s secure website

Card Details
Intro Apr:
N/A


Ongoing Apr:
17.39% (variable)


Balance Transfer:
N/A


Annual Fee:
$35


Credit Needed:
Fair-Poor-Bad-No Credit

Snapshot of Card Features
  • No credit check necessary to apply. OpenSky believes in giving an opportunity to everyone.
  • The refundable* deposit you provide becomes your credit line limit on your Visa card. Choose it yourself, from as low as $200.
  • Build credit quickly. OpenSky reports to all 3 major credit bureaus.
  • 99% of our customers who started without a credit score earned a credit score record with the credit bureaus in as little as 6 months.
  • We have a Facebook community of people just like you; there is a forum for shared experiences, and insights from others on our Facebook Fan page. (Search “OpenSky Card” in Facebook.)
  • OpenSky provides credit tips and a dedicated credit education page on our website to support you along the way.
  • *View our Cardholder Agreement located at the bottom of the application page for details of the card

Card Details +


The post 10 Ways to Build Credit Without a Credit Card appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

Citi Sears Credit Card – What You Need To Know

The Citi Sears card is our number #1 ranked store credit card. Readers often have a lot of questions regarding this card so I decided it was time for a dedicated post (you can read our basic review of the card here). The main reason this card is so popular is because of the frequent spending bonuses Citi sends out on this card, for example the current promotion is 10-20% back at gas, grocery & restaurants.

Citi Sears Card Versions

There are three versions or flavors of this card and the only real difference is the points currency they earn. The three are:

  • Shop Your Way Rewards (SYWR). This is the only version of the card you can sign up for directly currently. This is Sears points currency and can be used for items at Sears, although there is a new gift card option as well.
  • Citi ThankYou Points (TYP). This is Citi’s flexible point currency.
  • Statement Credit. This is cash back in the form of statement credit

Can You Product Change Between Cards?

It used to be possible to sign up for the SYWR version of this card and then product change to either the Citi TYP or statement credit version of this card. The rules then seemingly changed so that the original card needed to be open for a period of 12 months before the product change could be processed. In recent times people have reported being unable to product change, although there have been some reports of it still being possible.

Getting Targeted Spend Offers

When people first sign up for the card they often report not receiving any targeted spending offers. There are two theories:

  1. It takes a set amount of time before any offers will appear.
  2. You need spend on the card to be eligible for these offers.

I think it’s probably a combination of the two in that no matter how much spend you put on the card in the first few months you still might miss out on the first few offers. Once you start receiving an offers you’ll usually have a lot of spend on the card anyway as the offers are so good.

Final Thoughts

This article is a work in progress, I’ll add any other relevant information and answer any questions people have.

F.A.Q’s

Do the spend offers stack?

Yes, the offers do stack. For example if you have the following two offers:

  • Get 10% back at gas/grocery/restaurants from 1/1/21 until 3/3/21
  • Spend $2,000 or more with your Citi Sears Card from 2/1/21 until 4/1/21 and earn a $90 statement credit

Then you could spend $2,000 at a gas station and earn $200 from the first promotion and an additional $90 from the second promotion. The dates and offers are just an example.

What’s the best sign up bonus offer on this card?

Most people get this card for the spending bonuses rather than the sign up bonus. I believe the highest bonus we’ve seen is $200 as a sign up bonus, but again the real deal is in the spending offers.

 

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Your Secret Credit Weapon: The Chargeback

Credit card being run through a card reader.

 

Credit cards can open numerous doors of opportunities, and many even offer great cash-back rewards. But credit cards can also give you a good defense against untrustworthy online sellers. In the event of a dispute with a merchant, it provides the ultimate ace up your sleeve: the chargeback.

What Is a Credit Chargeback?

If you didn’t receive something you ordered, if you received the wrong item, or you just feel otherwise wronged by a transaction, a chargeback can return the money you spend to your account when the merchant refuses to do so. To initiate a credit chargeback, you can file a claim with your credit card company against a merchant. If your card issuer deems your complaint has merit, it will remove the money you paid from the merchant’s account and put it back in yours. Your credit card company is kind of like a tough older brother, talking to the bully who took your lunch money and getting it back.

Find Your Card Now
Privacy Policy

Is a Chargeback the Same as a Refund?

A chargeback isn’t the same as a refund and shouldn’t be viewed as an alternative. A credit card chargeback should be requested only when a seller or merchant refuses to return your money of its own accord. If a product proves defective or never arrives on your doorstep, your first stop should be traditional channels—that is, the retailer’s customer service desk or phone number.

If, after that, the merchant refuses a rightful refund, you can bring in your bank. Your credit card issuer should have clear instructions for formally disputing a charge, with options including a phone call, a written letter or an online form. There are often time limits and other criteria that must be met so you can’t request a return of funds for a purchase made years ago.

What Qualifies for a Credit Chargeback?

Before you request a chargeback, it’s important to note that some situations qualify and some don’t. The Fair Credit Billing Act is a federal law that dictates how credit card fraud and billing disputes are handled. It defines a number of situations as billing errors, including “goods or services not accepted by the obligor or his designee or not delivered to the obligor or his designee in accordance with the agreement made at the time of a transaction.”

In other words, if you order a product and it never arrives—or if you refuse delivery because it’s not what you expected to receive or it’s been damaged before getting to you—you’re entitled to your money back.

On the other hand, being unsatisfied with a purchase or a product isn’t a reason to request a credit chargeback. The National Consumer Law Center notes in its guide to credit card rights, “You cannot raise a complaint about the quality of merchandise or services you bought with a credit card in the form of a billing dispute.”

Your disappointment will probably help you get a refund, but involving your bank in petty grievances isn’t the way to go. Besides, cardholders who “cry wolf” too often and request too many credit chargebacks will have their requests taken less seriously and may even be put off for months.

Does a Chargeback Affect Your Credit?

A chargeback does not usually affect your credit. The act of filing a chargeback because of a legitimate cause for complaint against a business won’t affect your credit score. The issuer may add a dispute notation to your credit report, but such a notation does not have a negative effect on your credit. You may also be expected to make payments on the disputed charge until the investigation is completed, and late payments will affect your credit score.

However, if your complaint is illegitimate or determined to be fraudulent, your account can be closed by your credit provider, which can affect your score. Even if your charge is legitimate, sometimes the bank will side with the merchant, and then you’ll have to pay accompanying fees. Still, there usually isn’t any negative outcome for your credit score for simply requesting a credit chargeback.

How Do Banks Handle Chargebacks?

As long as the credit card issuer follows the guidelines set out in federal law, it can set its own procedures for how to handle disputes. Take, for instance, the timeframe in which cardholders must contact their issuers, which is set by the FCBA at a minimum of 60 days. Some institutions may extend the timeframe allowed to dispute a charge, but they cannot go below 60 days.

Banks can also ask for documentation to support the cardholder’s claim, including any documentation that will help the issuer fully inform the merchant about the nature of the dispute. So, don’t dispute a charge unless you have some evidence to back up your claim.

Think of disputing your charge like you’re going to court. If you want to make a case against someone or some entity, you need solid, concrete evidence to even have that person arrested and charged. You’ll need some proof of the validity of your dispute for a credit card issuer to even consider your chargeback case.

Finally, it’s worth noting that some banks may go above and beyond the general dispute resolution guidelines to achieve optimal customer satisfaction. Some may even provide a courtesy credit to customers at a loss for the bank.

How Does a Visa Chargeback Work?

Every credit card company handles disputes and credit card issues in a different way. Visa, one of the largest credit card companies, changed its chargeback rules and techniques in 2018 in hopes to streamline and speed up the process.

Visa defines a chargeback as “the reversal of the dollar value (in whole or in part) of a transaction by the card issuer to the acquirer, and usually, by the merchant bank to the merchant.”

At one point, Visa chargebacks took over a month and a half to resolve. However, the process is now mostly automated, meaning customers and merchants don’t have to wait weeks for an issue to be settled.

The process Visa follows is mostly like other companies. When a customer disputes a charge, Visa asks the customer for information about the transaction. An acquirer can then forward that information to a merchant, giving the merchant the option to dispute the customer’s complaint with evidence of its own. The acquirer then collects all of the information and decides who is at fault.

Visa now addresses these disputes from an unbiased perspective, in contrast with its prior perspective as a representative of the customer. Visa’s automated systems act impartially and assign liability to whichever party it deems responsible.

What Is a Return Item Chargeback on a Bank Statement?

A return item chargeback isn’t actually related to the act of disputing a charge through a credit chargeback. A return item chargeback occurs when a bank charges a fee to a cardholder or consumer because of a bounced or rejected check.

A bank will attempt to cash or accept a check for deposit, but the other bank will refuse to make the funds available or a problem will be encountered with the check itself. Thus, a fee will be charged to the writer of the rejected check.

These return item chargebacks will show up on a bank statement as a fee. Consumers want to make sure to avoid this by regularly reviewing their bank statements and always ensuring they have adequate funds before writing a check.

Credit Chargebacks as Consumer Tool

Chargebacks are a potent tool in the consumer’s arsenal, to the point that even threatening a chargeback may scare shady merchants into resolving the disputes themselves. After all, businesses can be seriously hurt if too many chargebacks are requested, even to the point of a bank shutting down its account. Every chargeback also costs merchants a fee, so it’s understandable that merchants want to avoid these if possible.

If the retailer still doesn’t blink, however, don’t hesitate to follow through and take advantage of this key aspect of consumer protection.

 

The post Your Secret Credit Weapon: The Chargeback appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com